Editorial roundup


• The (Youngstown) Vindicator, Dec. 28

Consider for a moment this common scenario that has played out for decades in the annals of puzzling public-school policy: A middle-school student who hates the self-perceived bondage of mandatory class attendance skips school for 10 consecutive days. When his ruse is finally discovered, his punishment for the infraction amounts to a permission slip to bypass class for another 10 days…

In the process, students, educators and taxpayers alike all suffer the consequences. That’s why legislation to effectively ban the use of out-of-school suspensions for truancy demands thoughtful and careful consideration by state lawmakers.

… House Bill 410 calls for implementing uniformity among districts when dealing with truancy and excessive absenteeism, encourages earlier intervention of absentees, gives districts more tools to address the root causes of truancy and works to avoid criminalization that truancy often produces…

The growing rates of out-of-school suspensions and the growing body of evidence supporting their long-term harm make Hayes’ and Rezabek’s legislation long overdue…

Our one warning to legislators on both sets of legislation, however, would be to craft final bills that do not sock additional cost burdens onto the already cash-strapped predicaments many districts find themselves in.

… House Bill 410 offers a strong foundation for a new approach to discipline in state schools without additional costs…

Online: http://bit.ly/1QWPciu

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