Miami County hunters harvest 211 deer

Last updated: December 27. 2013 8:16AM - 2162 Views
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Lima News PhotoDeer hunting in Ohio continues to be a popular activity for many who enjoy the outdoors. Ohio ranks fifth nationally in resident hunters and 11th in the number of jobs associated with hunting-related industries. Above, a group of deer graze along South Dixie Highway near Lima.
Lima News PhotoDeer hunting in Ohio continues to be a popular activity for many who enjoy the outdoors. Ohio ranks fifth nationally in resident hunters and 11th in the number of jobs associated with hunting-related industries. Above, a group of deer graze along South Dixie Highway near Lima.
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Looking back at deer season …


Ohio hunters checked 75,408 white-tailed deer during this year’s deer-gun season, down about 13 percent from last year’s total when hunters harvested 86,893.


Hunters may not like that, but the Ohio Division of Wildlife is fine with it.


The goal of Ohio’s Deer Management Program is to provide a deer population that maximizes recreational opportunities, while minimizing conflicts with landowners and motorists. This ensures that Ohio’s deer herd is maintained at a level that is both acceptable to most, and biologically sound, said the Ohio Division of Wildlife.


Until recently, the populations in nearly all of Ohio’s counties were well above their target numbers. In the last few years, through increased harvests, dramatic strides have been made in many counties to bring those populations closer toward their goal. Once a county’s deer population is near goal, harvest regulations are adjusted to maintain the population near that goal.


TOP COUNTIES: Coshocton County had the highest number of deer taken among Ohio counties, with 2,658. Other top counties were Muskingum (with 2,604 deer taken), Tuscarawas (2,604), Guernsey (2,401), Ashtabula (2,334), Harrison (2,133), Carroll (2,019), Knox (1,966), Licking (1,887) and Belmont (1,851).


Coshocton County also had the most deer checked in the 2012 deer gun season, with 3,119.


DEATHS: Three Ohio hunters were killed during weeklong gun-hunting season that ended last week — the first hunters a hunter has been killed while deer hunting since 2009. The fatalities occurred in Fulton County in northwest Ohio; Coshocton County in southeast Ohio and Gallia County in southcentral Ohio. Each of three deaths involved shootings that likely were accidental, the ODNR reported.


FAILURE RATE: About two-thirds of Ohio’s deer hunters come up empty in a given year.


CAUGHT: Eighteen employees of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife were hunting deer on state time, according to an investigation released this week.


“The timekeeping records for 18 wildlife employees contained conflicting information which showed wrongful activity: either the employee was on-duty while engaged in deer hunting activities, or off-duty and falsifying work records to obtain pay they were not entitled to receive,” the Ohio inspector general’s office found.


Department spokeswoman Bethany McCorkle said the wildlife officers were re-assigned to administrative duties today. Their final discipline will be determined by an internal investigation that could take two to four months, she said.


ECONOMIC IMPACT: Deer hunting in Ohio continues to be a popular activity for many who enjoy the outdoors. Ohio ranks fifth nationally in resident hunters and 11th in the number of jobs associated with hunting-related industries. Hunting has a more than $853 million economic impact in Ohio through the sale of equipment, fuel, food, lodging and more.


MORE TO GO: Though the gun season is over, hunters still will have the opportunity to hunt deer during archery and muzzleloader season. Archery season remains open now through Feb. 2. The muzzleloader season will run Jan. 4-7.


FEEDING THE HUNGRY: The ODNR Division of Wildlife is working with Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry (FHFH) to help pay for the processing of donated venison. Hunters who donate a deer to a food bank are not required to pay the processing cost as long as funding for the effort is available. More information about this program can be found online at fhfh.org. Other opportunities for hunters to donate venison can be pursued through Safari Club International’s Sportsmen Against Hunger program.


A list of all white-tailed deer checked by hunters during weeklong 2013 deer-gun hunting season is shown below. The first number following the county’s name shows the harvest numbers for 2013, and the 2012 numbers are in parentheses.


FIRST GUN SEASON: Ohio’s first modern day deer-gun season opened in 1943 in three counties, and hunters harvested 168 deer. Deer hunting was allowed in all 88 counties in 1956, and as of Wednesday, there have been 163,598 deer harvested in Ohio during the 2013-14 season.


COUNTY BY COUNTY: County totals across the state for the deer-gun season.


Adams: 1,343 (1,554); Allen: 380 (393); Ashland: 1,162 (1,240); Ashtabula: 2,334 (2,052); Athens: 1,745 (1,983); Auglaize: 299 (362); Belmont: 1,851 (2,127); Brown: 932 (1,094); Butler: 312 (350); Carroll: 2,019 (2,062); Champaign: 414 (487); Clark: 198 (226); Clermont: 667 (835); Clinton: 250 (348); Columbiana: 1,726 (1,686); Coshocton: 2,658 (3,119); Crawford: 528 (543); Cuyahoga: 31 (30); Darke: 170 (312); Defiance: 744 (882); Delaware: 393 (620); Erie: 176 (171); Fairfield: 827 (1,040); Fayette: 103 (111); Franklin: 113 (176); Fulton: 341 (413);


Gallia: 1,420 (1,747); Geauga: 509 (598); Greene: 224 (318); Guernsey: 2,401 (2,620); Hamilton: 202 (244); Hancock: 338 (558); Hardin: 544 (512); Harrison: 2,133 (2,370); Henry: 326 (346); Highland: 1,041 (1,347); Hocking: 1,456 (1,966); Holmes: 1,494 (1,837); Huron: 1,029 (1,006); Jackson: 1,156 (1,439); Jefferson: 1,494 (1,830); Knox: 1,966 (2,159); Lake: 126 (207); Lawrence: 1,002 (1,286); Licking: 1,887 (2,271); Logan: 653 (755); Lorain: 678 (764); Lucas: 131 (158); Madison: 127 (141); Mahoning: 750 (664); Marion: 348 (410); Medina: 555 (596);


Meigs: 1,482 (1,764); Mercer: 219 (318); Miami: 211 (241); Monroe: 1,337 (1,695); Montgomery: 109 (162); Morgan: 1,445 (1,712); Morrow: 640 (844); Muskingum: 2,604 (2,927); Noble: 1,454 (1,647); Ottawa: 88 (86); Paulding: 499 (551); Perry: 1,362 (1,726); Pickaway: 343 (500); Pike: 818 (973); Portage: 568 (608); Preble: 274 (323); Putnam: 255 (327); Richland: 1,182 (1,418); Ross: 1,167 (1,512); Sandusky: 208 (224); Scioto: 1,099 (1,138); Seneca: 747 (803); Shelby: 371 (456); Stark: 883 (833); Summit: 140 (163); Trumbull: 1,298 (1,237); Tuscarawas: 2,604 (2,860); Union: 301 (352); Van Wert: 214 (290); Vinton: 1,424 (1,583); Warren: 285 (406); Washington: 1,606 (2,163); Wayne: 724 (784); Williams: 838 (906); Wood: 213 (254); Wyandot: 690 (812). Total: 75,408 (86,963).


SOURCES: Ohio Division of Natural Resources; National Shooting Sports Foundation; Columbus Dispatch; The Lima News.


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