By Patrick D. Kennedy - Archivist



Photo courtesy of the Troy-Miami County Public Library’s Local History Library An image of an 1939 advertisement for the Farmer’s Cooperative Dairy.


25 Years Ago: February 7-13, 1991

• Bethel Township – The Bethel School District, according to the board of education, is facing about 100 cutbacks is teachers, athletics, art, drama, etc., if the district levy fails in May. The board heard testimony from many, including students, that it would be the young people that would suffer the most if the cuts are made. Although many programs would suffer, the hardest hit would be athletics. Superintendent Campbell stated the cuts are necessary if the levy does not pass and they will be initiated on July 1st, the beginning of the new budget year.

50 Years Ago: February 7-13, 1966

• Piqua – The city is dealing with some serious water issues after a recent spill of a chemical into the river in DeGraff, north of here. Ten days ago, a railroad tanker car ended up in a stream that feeds the Miami River, Piqua’s source of water. While in the stream in leaked a chemical into the water stream and many Piqua residents are experiencing a funny odor and taste in their water. According to state officials, the chemical is not toxic when diluted, but many residents are not taking any chances and are boiling their water or using other sources.

75 Years Ago: February 7-13, 1941

• Troy – In the continuing call for men to be trained in defense preparation for the nation, another two calls have been made in Troy. For the first time, the call for men from Troy’s black community has been made. These seven men represent the first group of young black men from the southern area leaving for selective service duty. All of them are from Troy. The young men are: James Albert Hill, 21; Hiram Charles Hill, 22; Marvin Hill, 32; Wilbur Crowder, 28; Walter Moten Thompson, 31 and Harry Clifton Lovely, 23. Hiram Hill and Marvin Hill are volunteers and Harry Lovely is an alternate in case any of the others are unable to go. In addition to these men, a fifth call for white men from Troy has been made. (Columnist’s Note: Although I am not positive, I believe the ‘southern area’ referred to in the original article meant the southern portion of Ohio.)

• Historical Questions: This week I received a call from Mrs. Phyllis Bair who wanted to know about the Farmer’s Co-Operative Dairy in Troy. She told me the story of a former neighbor who, when she was a girl, would carry cream from her family farm to the railroad station at Grayson Station (Elizabeth Township) in order to drop it off for shipment into Troy. She would then go on to school at the Walnut Grove School.

Mrs. Bair also has a bottle from the Farmer’s Co-Operative Dairy and wanted to know if this later became Sander’s Dairy. Was this the place where here neighbor was sending the cream to be processed?

The Troy Milk & Butter Co. first appeared in Troy in 1906 and was located on North Mulberry Street until it removed to North Cherry about 1915-16. This local company had a store and office-plant at the North Cherry location, but also had a farm outside of Troy. Around 1925, the company became a cooperative and likely involved many local farmers. The Miami Valley Cooperative Milk Producer’s Association was started in the region and, in the 1920’s and 1930’s, was the seventh largest operation in the state. In 1932, The Farmer’s Co-Operative Dairy appears in the Troy directories, along with the Miami Valley Cooperative. Farmer’s being the local agency and the Miami Valley company, being the area cooperative. Around the end of WWII, the Farmer’s name disappeared and Sander’s Dairy arrives in Troy, which likely bought out the Miami Valley Cooperative.

According to a Dairy history resource, the progression of ownership was as follows: the Troy Milk & Butter Company became the Troy Milk & Butter Cooperative Association, which became the Miami Valley Milk Producers Association, which, eventually, became the Sander’s Dairy that many longtime Trojans will remember.

According to the dairy history, “In the earlier years, many small producers would separate the cream and feed the skim milk to the hogs. They would take the cream into the local cream station and receive cash for it. This provided extra income, and they did not have to put up with inspection.” The cream that Mrs. Bair’s neighbor brought to the railroad station and shipped into Troy would have arrived at the cream station on N. Cherry Street.

Photo courtesy of the Troy-Miami County Public Library’s Local History Library An image of an 1939 advertisement for the Farmer’s Cooperative Dairy.
http://dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_Farmers-27-Coop.-Dairy-1939-600-Color-001.jpgPhoto courtesy of the Troy-Miami County Public Library’s Local History Library An image of an 1939 advertisement for the Farmer’s Cooperative Dairy.

By Patrick D. Kennedy

Archivist

Patrick D. Kennedy is archivist at the Troy-Miami County Public Library’s Local History Library, 100 W. Main St., Troy. He may be contacted by calling (937) 335-4082 or sending an email to [email protected]

Patrick D. Kennedy is archivist at the Troy-Miami County Public Library’s Local History Library, 100 W. Main St., Troy. He may be contacted by calling (937) 335-4082 or sending an email to [email protected]

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