Cellular Connection creating a ‘culture of good’


Cellular Connection selling products to benefit children’s hospital

By Sam Wildow - [email protected]



The display of screen-cleaning cloths on sale at The Cellular Connection (TCC) location in Piqua. The cloths, which feature artwork done by Riley Hospital youths, are on sale at TCC for $10, with 100 percent of the sales going back to Riley Hospital.


Sam Wildow | Daily Call

The screen-cleaning cloth featuring artwork done by Layla Cunningham of Indianapolis. The cloths are on sale at TCC for $10 with 100 percent of the sales going back to Riley Hospital.


Sam Wildow | Daily Call

PIQUA — The Cellular Connection (TCC) in Piqua is continuing its company’s initiative of giving back to the community by selling screen-cleaning cloths to benefit the patients of Riley Hospital for Children, located in Indiana.

“We call it a culture movement of doing good,” Mike Betts, sales representative, said on Wednesday.

The Piqua TCC location has been selling the cloths for approximately a month.

“And there’s no end date,” Betts said. “We actually sold a lot of them.”

The different cloths that are available feature artwork that five different Riley Hospital youths created.

Layla Cunningham of Indianapolis is one of the artists. She was diagnosed with a brain tumor when she was four years old and later with kidney cancer when she 10. According to her bio, her cancerous kidney was removed and she is doing well. Cunningham is described as “spunky and loves to sing, dance and make other people happy by drawing cards for them.”

Another one of the artists is Braden Tamosaitis of Camby, Ind. Tamosaitis was born with spina bifida, hydrocephalus, and Arnold Chiari II malformation. Tamosaitis experienced his first surgery just hours after he was born and has undergone 15 more surgeries.

Tamosaitis is described as “one of the most motivated kids you’ll ever meet” in his bio. Tamosaitis is also said to be courageous and full of determination to help others despite his medical obstacles.

Olivia Pierce of Hobart, Ind., is the next artist. At three months old, she was diagnosed with malignant tumors affecting both of her eyes. While chemotherapy shrunk the retinoblastoma tumors in Olivia’s right eye, doctors still had to remove Pierce’s left eye.

Pierce has undergone 35 surgeries at Riley Hospital. In her bio, she is described as charismatic and enthusiastic.

Currently being treated through the muscular dystrophy clinic at Riley Hospital, Nina McCrary of Indianapolis is another one of the cleaning cloth artists. McCrary underwent genetic testing to reveal that she has a rare mitochondrial DNA variant. According to her bio, she enjoys dancing and singing.

Dejon Walker of Valparaiso, Ind., is the fifth artist and was five years old when doctors diagnosed with him with the rare respiratory disease called pulmonary lymphangiectasia. Walker had to undergo emergency surgery and a tracheotomy in order to breathe.

Walker now “loves to ride his bike and play tennis,” according to his bio. Walker also excels in school and hopes to be a police officer one day.

The cloths are on sale at TCC for $10, with 100 percent of the sales going back to Riley Hospital.

“It all benefits them,” Gerad Jacobs, sales representative, said.

Jacobs explained that this is not the first time that TCC given back to the community. As part of their company-wide “Culture of Good” movement, the Piqua TCC location gave away approximately 250 back packs at the beginning of August.

“It is pretty awesome what they do,” Jacobs said about TCC.

“As part of our continued efforts to give back and make a difference in the lives of children across the country, there was no doubt in our minds that we wanted to get involved with Riley Hospital,” TCC CEO Scott Moorehead said in a press release.

“Simply writing a check isn’t what we’re about at TCC,” continued Moorehead. “Instead, we developed a plan to give back to Riley Hospital in a way no one has before. It’s a privilege to help brighten the days for the children of Riley Hospital, and I couldn’t be more proud.”

Founded in 1991, TCC is the largest Verizon Premium Wireless Retailer in the U.S., operating more than 630 locations in 37 states from coast to coast.

The company is guided by its “Virtuous Circle of Success” principle, which is the idea that employees, customers, and communities matter equally. TCC’s nationally-recognized “Culture of Good” movement encourages employees to give back to the community they serve.

To learn more about the company, visit www.TCCRocks.com. To learn more about Riley Hospital, visit www.rileykids.org.

The display of screen-cleaning cloths on sale at The Cellular Connection (TCC) location in Piqua. The cloths, which feature artwork done by Riley Hospital youths, are on sale at TCC for $10, with 100 percent of the sales going back to Riley Hospital.
http://dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_CMYK-awesome-cloths.jpgThe display of screen-cleaning cloths on sale at The Cellular Connection (TCC) location in Piqua. The cloths, which feature artwork done by Riley Hospital youths, are on sale at TCC for $10, with 100 percent of the sales going back to Riley Hospital. Sam Wildow | Daily Call

The screen-cleaning cloth featuring artwork done by Layla Cunningham of Indianapolis. The cloths are on sale at TCC for $10 with 100 percent of the sales going back to Riley Hospital.
http://dailycall.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_CMYK-Awesome-cloth-2.jpgThe screen-cleaning cloth featuring artwork done by Layla Cunningham of Indianapolis. The cloths are on sale at TCC for $10 with 100 percent of the sales going back to Riley Hospital. Sam Wildow | Daily Call
Cellular Connection selling products to benefit children’s hospital

By Sam Wildow

[email protected]

Reach reporter Sam Wildow at (937) 451-3336 or on Twitter @TheDailyCall

Reach reporter Sam Wildow at (937) 451-3336 or on Twitter @TheDailyCall

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