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Columnist shares inspiring story

By Susan Hartley

January 21, 2014

Wow! I just read an article that I have to share with you. It’s from the fall issue of Diabetic Living and is about Meri Schuhmacher and her family. You see, three of four of Schuhmacher’s sons have type 1 diabetes. Her oldest son does not have it but the other three ages 15, 11, and 9 do. It says in the article that after the third diagnosis, she “went into a pretty deep funk” but the way she pulled herself out of it is so amazing. I found so much inspiration in this story and I hope you do too.


She was sitting in bed one night crying and telling her husband that life was not supposed to be like this. Moms aren’t supposed to have three little boys attached to insulin pumps. That’s when her husband told her that he didn’t believe God sent them here to be miserable so they needed to find their happiness. And that’s just what she did. Her happiness came from writing. She has a blog, Our Diabetic Life, which is absolutely wonderful. I just read her latest post, I’ll Take It, All of It, and she describes the disease so well.


Another reason I’m so amazed by Schumacher is because she lost her husband, her high school sweetheart and soul mate, to melanoma leaving her to fight the boys’ diabetes battles on her own (Of course they’re at the age where they can help but emotionally she’s on her own.) but she’s not letting that stop her or get her down.


In the article, they give an excerpt from one of her blog posts in which she writes, “Fighting diabetes, hating diabetes – it’s OK. But letting those things take over is not. Sometimes I just need to stand up and say, ‘They’re OK! I’m OK! We will survive!”


In her most recent post she talks about crying herself to sleep. She’s very real and that’s one thing I love. You know sometimes it just sucks and it’s good to put that out there in addition to the times when you feel like you can tackle this diabetes thing head on! It’s a rollercoaster of emotions and it’s nice that she shares it all.


In the article the writer talks about Schumacher’s phone ringing. It’s her son. He’s at school and eating. She tells him how many carbs are in his food and hangs up. She then looks out the window and says, “He’s 300. What’s up with that?”


And that is how the article ends. An absolutely perfect ending. I can not tell you how many times I’ve wondered what’s up with that.